Call 7 Days a Week (03) 9870 5105

Puppy Training

Give your puppy the best possible start

Adorable can turn to naughty very quickly

Bringing a new puppy into your home is a special time. You can’t get enough of their cuddles and cuteness – at least until the weeing, chewing, biting or jumping begins.

Did you know that the first 18 weeks of your puppy’s life is the most crucial learning period? So you don’t have much time for false starts. And remember: a naughty, untrained puppy can quickly become a badly behaved adult dog.

Lola has completely transformed

Carly M, Carrum

‘Our 15-week-old American Staffordshire Lola used to be a little terror. She would pull so hard on her lead that she choked herself – and refused to let go of socks, shoes and whatever else she could find. And when we tried to play with her, she would bite the entire time. But since John’s help, Lola has completely transformed. She walks on her lead like a dream, no longer jumps on the couch and hasn’t bitten us once!’

Choose your puppy training approach wisely

Contrary to popular belief, puppy training schools are often ineffective because they don’t teach you how to handle your puppy in its own environment. And surprisingly, they can actually hinder positive socialisation rather than promote it.

In fact, 8 out 10 badly behaved dogs we train were once puppy school ‘graduates’!

We give you the solid foundation you need

At AUSDOG, we come to your home to help you set a solid foundation for your pup’s future good behaviour. Through education and support, we help you:

  • Settle your puppy into its new environment
  • Establish designated feeding, sleeping and toilet areas
  • Implement a routine to suit your lifestyle
  • Learn how to handle and communicate with your puppy – the right way, right away

Very happy clients

Dr Alan, Mont Albert Vet Surgery

‘My experiences with AUSDOG have always been very positive. All my referred clients have been very happy with their outcomes, including those with dogs that had very complex problems.’

Simple, straightforward advice for the whole family

Biting, chewing and jumping are not part and parcel of puppy rearing. These behaviours can be avoided. And if they’ve already started? You can and should correct them as soon as possible.

We help you and your children address the specific challenges that come with bringing a new puppy into your home – such as:

  • Nipping, chewing, mouthing or biting
  • Jumping on family members and visitors
  • Crying and separation anxiety
  • Pulling on lead and poor behaviour with other dogs
  • Setting physical boundaries in the home
  • Overexcitement and unnecessary barking
  • Digging, burying and other destructive behaviours

We came back to John after 12 years

Paula C, Kew

‘When we adopted our dog Aus 12 years ago, John’s advice was invaluable. We recently reached out to him again for help with our new Labradoodle puppy. John’s approach was just as effective and fun as it was 12 years ago!’

Yes! We’re ready to give our puppy the best possible start.

Enquire now

Advice from John

Children & Dogs

Don’t just take it for granted that because your dog is good with your children that he or she will be fine with all children. Don’t be paranoid, however, exercise caution with dogs around children, particularly those under 8 years. Also be very careful with puppies and small children, often children don’t realise their strength and can damage internal organs on pup with a very affectionate cuddle.

READ MORE

Christmas time and lots of food around

Be certain to ask your guests not to feed your dog. Many foods that are fine for humans are not so good for dogs.
The last thing you want during the festive season is a sick dog and a big Vet bill.
Ask your Vet to provide you with a list of dangerous foods and plants and don’t over feed your dog.

READ MORE

Heat and Dogs

Dogs rarely die from cold, but often die from heat exhaustion. Please exercise plenty of care over the summer months, a dog can die locked in a hot car just as quickly as a child can. Also be very cautious on hot pavements, dogs pads are no tougher than our feet unless conditioned. Even then radiant heat from the pavement is not far from dogs vital organs. It is never a good idea to walk your dog in the heat of the day.

READ MORE